Full Course Description


Rewire the Anxious Brain: Neuroscience-Informed Treatment of Anxiety, Panic and Worry

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Ascertain the underlying neurological processes that impact anxious symptoms for clients.
  2. Develop client engagement in treatment using personalized goals and attending to the therapeutic relationship.
  3. Evaluate the differences between amygdala-based and cortex-based anxiety symptoms and identify how these symptoms inform treatment interventions.
  4. Communicate strategies for calming and training the amygdala in order to alleviate symptoms of anxiety.
  5. Implement methods for teaching clients to retrain the cortex so that anxiety is resisted rather than exacerbated.
  6. Analyze how psychotropic medication impacts neuroplasticity in the brain; identify related treatment implications.

Outline

Use Neuroscience in the Treatment of Anxiety

Enhancing Engagement in Treatment Neuroplasticity Identify Two Neural Pathways to Anxiety Client Friendly Explanations Neuroplasticity in the Amygdala (Essential for all Anxiety Disorders, PTSD, OCD, Depression) Neuroplasticity in the Cortex (Essential for GAD, SAD, OCD, PTSD, Depression) Neuroplasticity and Medications for Anxiety Disorders, OCD, PTSD, Depression Moving Beyond Diagnostic Categories to Focus on Anxiety Pathways Research, Risks and Limitations

Copyright : 04/28/2020

Ten Best-Ever Anxiety Treatment Techniques

Program Information

Outline

Assessment and Differential Diagnosis

Techniques That Work to Modulate Physiology Techniques for Treating Cognitive Problems of Anxiety and Panic Techniques for Managing Social Anxiety Limitations of the Research and Potential Risks

Objectives

  1. Determine the neurobiological causes of panic, generalized anxiety, and social anxiety and ascertain how this information impacts treatment decisions.
  2. Implement strategies for stress management to reduce symptoms of anxiety in clients, including lifestyle changes, cognitive interventions and time management tools.
  3. Perform effective use of diaphragmatic breathing techniques for physiological modulation in the treatment of anxiety.
  4. Demonstrate how the process of memory reconsolidation can be utilized to reduce reactivity to trauma cues, including shame trauma, that trigger social anxiety or panic attacks and sets up effective exposures to promote rapid recovery.
  5. Integrate specific clinical techniques to address persistent worry and understand how this changes the neurobiology of ruminative thought patterns in clients.
  6. Utilize cognitive therapy interventions with clients to manage perfectionism, procrastination and rigid approaches to problems.

Copyright : 08/23/2018

2-Day Intensive Training: Mindfulness Certification Course

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Investigate the empirical support for mindfulness and connect this information to clinical implications for various conditions.
  2. Evaluate how understandable descriptions of neurological processes underlying disorders, in conjunction with understandable explanations of how mindfulness affects those processes, can motivate clients to engage in treatment.
  3. Assess for situations that may contraindicate the use of mindfulness with clients.
  4. Support how mindfulness training can enhance the cultivation of the therapeutic relationship.
  5. Employ mindfulness practices to impact the stress reaction and shift clients to a relaxation response.
  6. Evaluate how mindfulness interventions utilized in treatment plans for anxiety can help counter automatic patterns of thoughts.
  7. Assess how mindfulness can be taught in the clinical setting to help depressed clients manage negative self-talk.
  8. Support how mindfulness can enhance addiction treatment and help clients identify triggers that could lead to relapse.
  9. Investigate how mindfulness and breathing techniques that reduce the body’s anger response can be taught in-session to help clients manage their angered outbursts.
  10. Employ grounding techniques and breathing exercises that can be used to increase feelings of safety in traumatized clients.
  11. Assess how integrating mindfulness as an adjunctive therapy can help clinicians diversify available clinical techniques and individualize treatment.
  12. Distinguish between individual and group mindfulness practices and identify which types of clients would benefit from each.
  13. Differentiate between formal and informal mindfulness practices and characterize how they can be used in conjunction with one another to address the unique needs of clients.

Outline

Mindfulness and the Clinician:
“Know What You Teach” and “Teach What You Know”

Mindfulness Psychoeducation Approaches:
Easy to Use Strategies to Enhance Motivation in Therapy
Deepen the Therapeutic Relationship:
Build Presence, Trust and Empathetic Connection with Clients
Teach Mindfulness to Clients:
Formal and Informal Mindfulness Practices
Group Therapy vs. Individual Sessions Anxiety and Stress:
Mindfulness Interventions to Relax the Body and Mind
Mindfulness for Trauma:
Disempower Intrusive Thoughts
Using Mindfulness in Depression Treatment Mindfulness for Addictions: Break the Habit Loop Mindful Anger: Breathing and Self-Soothing Techniques Mindfulness, Diversity, & Cultural Humility Mindfully Conquer Compassion Fatigue

Copyright : 10/06/2020