Full Course Description


2-Day Grief Treatment Certification Course: Evidence-Based Strategies for Helping Clients Make Meaning After Loss

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Differentiate relevant theories and models describing the physical and psychosocial effects of loss, grief, and mourning on the individual and family system and their clinical implications.
  2. Determine how to plan and implement appropriate assessments, interventions and strategies to help individuals and families cope with loss and grief to improve treatment outcomes.
  3. Perform a clinical assessment to inform the clinician’s choice of best treatment interventions for the reduction of symptoms of complicated grief, disenfranchised grief, or Persistent Complex Bereavement Disorder.
  4. Differentiate potential loss events occurring throughout the lifespan, including non-death situations, to inform the clinician’s choice of treatment interventions.
  5. Analyze the ethnic, gender, and cultural factors that affect individual responses to loss-related situations as it relates to case conceptualization.
  6. Evaluate factors that influence normal and complicated reactions to dying and grief in clients.
  7. Determine one’s own cognitive, affective, and behavioral reactions to death, dying, and bereavement, as it relates to professional practice with clients experiencing grief and loss.
  8. Differentiate theories and models of individual, cultural, couple, family, and community resilience in relation to assessment and treatment planning.
  9. Analyze the efficacy of various treatment interventions for complicated grief to improve clinical outcomes.
  10. Determine the ethical and legal issues in end-of-life decisions, such as suffering, dying, and choice, and their clinical implications.
  11. Utilize clinical strategies to assist grieving clients in the move from flight or fight to social engagement in session.
  12. Utilize the co-regulating pathways of the social engagement system in session as an approach to managing symptoms of complicated grief.

Outline

Types of Grief & Their Implications for Treatment

  • Disenfranchised grief
  • Persistent Complex Bereavement Disorder
  • Traumatic bereavement
  • Complicated Grief
    • Common trajectories for grief
    • Recognize complicated grief
    • Risk factors for complicated grief
    • Treatment Interventions
  • Types of Loss & Their Impact on Grieving
    • Parental loss
    • Child loss
    • Widowhood
    • Non-death losses
Assessment: Intake Considerations for Grieving Clients
  • Current conceptualization models
  • Recognize different expressions of grief
  • Factors impacting the grief experience
  • Assess for depression and suicide ideation
  • Differentiate between depression, grief, & PTSD
  • Use of Adjustment Disorder diagnosis with grief clients
  • Determine how the client understands their grief narrative
  • Persistent complex bereavement disorder
  • DSM-5® changes to Major Depressive Disorder
  • Take home assessment tools
Cultural Considerations for Grief Treatment
  • Cultural factors affecting expression of grief
  • Impact on mourning practices
  • Culture’s impact on death anxiety & meaning of life
  • Determine where the identity emphasis lies
  • Cultural values regarding emotional expression and disclosure
  • The impact of society on grief
Grief Treatment: Interventions & Strategies to Improve Clinical Outcomes
  • Assist clients with expressing their pain
  • Integrate a new inner image of the deceased
  • Client self-assessment strategies for coping
  • Foster client relaxation skills
  • Let the client lead: Starting point, story, & stopping point
  • Cultivate acceptance
  • Elicit emotional availability in clients
  • Give clients “permission” to not share stories
  • Focus on planning – not positivity
  • Develop healthy grief rituals
  • Target guilt due to stopping grief rituals
  • Build a bridge between memories, current behaviors, & underlying values
  • Help clients accept the finality of the death
  • Navigate the treatment of multiple losses
In-Session Activities: On-the-Spot Interventions to Facilitate Healing
  • The client “influence of loss” chart
  • Use loving kindness meditation to build self-compassion in clients
  • ”Who am I?” exercise
  • Utilize client letters to self
Grief Across the Lifespan: Help Your Clients Heal at Any Developmental Stage
  • Developmental considerations & milestones related to loss reactions for:
    • Children
    • Adolescents
    • Early adulthood
    • Middle adulthood
    • Later adulthood
Grief & the Family: Guide Families Through Healthy Grieving
  • Family systems theory: Family influences on individual grief
  • Variables that complicate family adaptation
  • Strategies to guide family adaptation to loss
  • Develop respect for different grieving styles
  • The role of gender norms
  • ”Family coat of arms” activity
Professional Issues: Ethical Considerations for Working with Grieving Clients, Their Families, & the Terminally Ill
  • Ethical dilemmas that confront the terminally ill
  • Ethical principles of end-of-life decisions
  • The clinician’s role in addressing psychological suffering & needs of the terminally ill
  • Impact of cause of death on social isolation
  • Identify the core values and principles of professional ethical behavior
  • Boundaries of professional competence

Copyright : 03/05/2020

Post-Traumatic Growth for Loss, Grief and Related Trauma: Guide Your Clients through the Losses in Life and Help Them Reinvest Themselves in a Life Worth Living

Program Information

Outline

  • Face Loss, Grief and Trauma with a Strengths-Based Approach
    • Crisis of belief and existential shattering
    • Meaning making and the importance of “why”
    • Grief vs. complicated grief
    • Abstract losses and the Ball of Grief
    • Tapping into resiliency
      • Core competencies and key principles
      • Identify your clients’ strengths
    • Current evidence on strengths-based approaches
  • Calm the Overactive Brain of Your Client
    • The neurobiology of the traumatized brain
    • Mindfulness and the art of noticing
    • Containment skills
    • Grounding exercises
    • Affect regulation
    • Breathing and soothing techniques
  • Tools for Managing Anger, Guilt, Shame and Traumatic Memories
    • Dealing with anger
      • The REACH model of forgiveness
      • Certificates of debt
      • The power of surrender
    • Address guilt and shame
      • How shame relates to trauma and loss
      • Faulty beliefs and getting stuck
      • Cognitive restructuring
    • Manage traumatic memories with CBT coping skills
      • Distraction techniques
      • Positive self-talk
  • Move Clients Toward Post-Traumatic Growth With Interventions Informed by Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)
    • Shattered Vase Exercise - plant the seeds of possibility
    • Creating narratives
    • Letter writing
    • Positive remembering and repositioning
    • Reframe the meaning
  • Expressive and Somatic Therapeutic Interventions To Cultivate Post-Traumatic Growth
    • Integrate left and right hemispheres
      • Art therapy
      • Writing to heal
    • Access and reclaim compassion
      • Somatic resourcing
      • Remembered resources
      • Assess clients self-talk
  • Reinvest in a Life Worth Living: Rekindle the Desires of the Heart
    • The PIE of life - brainstorm possibilities of growth
    • Cultivate social connection and re-engagement
      • Support and grief groups
      • Toxic people
      • Working with families impacted by loss
    • Choice and perspective
    • Foster gratitude and a spirit of contentment after loss
    • Measurements of Post-Traumatic Growth

Objectives

  1. Specify how a case conceptualization based on the strengths of the client can tap into their potential for resiliency and improve clinical outcomes.
  2. Analyze the neurobiology of the traumatized brain and effectively utilize clinical tools based in mindfulness and grounding to calm the biological stress response.
  3. Articulate the relationship of shame to trauma and loss and communicate how cognitive restructuring can be used in-session to manage the emotions of clients and open them to new possibilities.
  4. Employ powerful interventions informed by CBT, expressive therapies, and somatic psychotherapy to treat the devastating effects of loss and grief by reframing its associated meaning.
  5. Characterize the impact on clients, as well as the relevance to clinical practice, of connecting individuals and families affected by loss with social support and grief groups.
  6. Incorporate and individualize therapeutic interventions based in art and writing into treatment plans for loss, grief, and related trauma.

 

Copyright : 06/13/2018

Suicide Assessment and Intervention: Today's Top Challenges for Mental Health Professionals

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Conduct a thorough suicide assessment that includes both risk and protective factors.
  2. Implement clinical techniques to support clients’ ability to self-regulate, problem solve, and communicate their needs.
  3. Develop and monitor realistic safety plans that clients will participate in.
  4. Create accurate and comprehensive documentation of clinical crises to protect all parties involved and minimize liability risks.

Outline

Assessment: Your Comprehensive Guide to Identify Suicidal Risk

  • Suicide, ideation, plan, means and intent
  • Why do people kill themselves?
  • Risk and protective factors
  • How to identify implicit suicidal intent
  • Strategies for asking direct questions (even when it’s uncomfortable)
  • How to engage shut down, withdrawn or resistant clients
Suicide Intervention Strategies: Supporting Clients From “Passive” Ideation to Full-Blown Crisis
  • Psychological interventions
  • Problem solving
  • Emotional regulation
  • Communication
  • Pharmacology: Short and long term interventions
  • Why “no harm” contracts are a dangerous idea (and what to do instead)
  • When to break client confidentiality
  • How and when to involve loved ones/caregivers
  • Hospitalization: Why, when, how
    • Clinicians inside the ER: When to admit/planning for home
    • After the ER: Limiting the risk
  • Documentation: Protect your client, protect your license
Other Clinical Considerations
  • Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI)
  • Relationship between suicide, mental illness and trauma
  • Tips for managing clinician anxiety around suicidality

Copyright : 09/27/2019