Full Course Description


Developing Social-Emotional Skills & Self-Regulation in Students: Narrative Intervention for Long-Term Academic, Personal & Social Success!

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Articulate the relevance of storytelling to the English Language Arts (ELA) state standards and how storytelling meets IEP and curriculum goals.
  2. Analyze the types of storytelling and their connection to social-emotional development in students.
  3. Employ tools to assess and document the development of students’ narrative structure, coherence, vocabulary, and linguistic elements.
  4. Analyze the relationships between setting, plot, character traits, social-emotional skills, self-regulation, self-identity, and problem solving.
  5. Utilize age-appropriate literature to help students connect emotions/behaviors/mental states of characters to self to promote self-regulation.
  6. Apply strategies to support inferential thinking by relating emotions and mental states to events.
  7. Facilitate students’ recognition of characterization, plot, and theme in fictional stories, autobiographical narratives, and life stories.

Outline

The Relevance of Storytelling to ELA State Standards

  • The 4 related domains of state standards
  • Meet IEP goals and interventions while supporting curriculum goals
  • Instructional strategies to promote language and literacy skills
The Relevance of Storytelling to Social-Emotional Development
  • Support classroom curriculum while meeting students’ needs
  • Social-emotional skills
  • Self-regulation
  • Self-identity
  • Self-determination
  • Problem solving
Types of Storytelling and Connection to Social-Emotional Development
  • Fictional
  • Personal/autobiographical
  • Life stories
  • Cultural variations and impact on narratives
Stages of Narrative Development and Development of “Self”
  • Physical – Emotional attachment and shared emotions
  • Social – Attention, intention, and communication
  • Cognitive – I/You perspective, sense of self, reference to self
  • Representational – Talking about the past
  • Narrative – Stories of me/others, past/future, worlds outside this one
  • Cultural – Stories of us in the world
A Window into a Student’s Ability to Construct a Story
  • Rubrics to evaluate narrative structure, coherence, vocabulary, and linguistic elements
  • Existing assessment tools and level of scaffolding provided
  • Personal, fictional, and life story narratives: Case examples ages 8-20
Strategies to Develop Detailed and Coherent Stories
  • Story grammar that builds coherent narratives and elements that affect characters’ behavior and self-regulation
  • Ways to help student recognize mental states in characters, themselves, and others (Theory of Mind)
  • Connecting emotions/behaviors/mental states of characters to self to promote self-regulation
  • Vocabulary and syntax necessary to express connections between mental/emotional states and behaviors/events
  • Literature that triggers reminiscing
Strategies to Develop and Integrate Life Stories
  • Role of characterization in life stories
  • Using biographies/autobiographies to understand characterization
  • Identification and development of themes
  • Support inferential thinking for “why events occurred” and “why characters reacted”

Copyright : 02/21/2020

Children with Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs): Interventions for the Caregiver & Child

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Determine the effects of adverse childhood experiences on children’s language and social-emotional development
  2. Develop caregiver-child interventions that promote attunement/affect management
  3. Implement strategies to promote resiliency and language for personal narratives/self-regulation

Outline

ACEs and Development

  • Types of ACEs
  • Biological/neurological effects
  • How attachment mediates trauma
  • Autobiographical memory
  • Narratives in parents & children who have experienced ACEs
  • Framework for intervention

Interventions that Promote Attunement/Affect Management

  • Goals for caregiver intervention
  • Recognizing temperaments
  • How children respond to danger
  • Using mindfulness and mindsight in responding to children’s behaviors

Promote Resiliency for Personal Narratives and Self-Regulation

  • Aspects of self-identity to develop
  • Childhood competencies to development
  • Characteristics of reminiscing
  • How to reminisce
  • Develop child’s emotional understanding: emotion coaching, reading body cues, recognizing emotions in stories

Copyright : 07/31/2020

Screen Time, Learning, & Communication in the 21st Century

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Determine the benefits and risks of screen time and why some persons are at increased risk or negative effects of screen time
  2. Formulate why children with developmental disabilities are more at risk for the negative effects of screen time 
  3. Utilize strategies and resources for managing screen time and alternatives to screen time that meets each child’s unique needs

Outline

Screen Time: Risks and Benefits

  • Positive benefits
  • Concerns regarding screen time
    • Multitasking and continuous partial attention
    • Health concerns
    • Violence and games
    • Effects on memory and learning
    • Social media
    • Mental health
    • Addiction

Children with Higher Risk for Negative Effects

  • Developmental disabilities
  • Factors in choosing appropriate media
  • Children’s environmental sensitivities

Strategies for Managing Screen Time and Alternatives

  • Context: technoference
  • Content: engagement, active involvement, meaningful, social
  • Meeting each child’s unique needs

Copyright : 07/31/2020