Full Course Description


Treating Adult Clients of Emotionally Immature Parents: How Your Clients Can Reclaim Their Lives from the Toxic Legacy of Controlling, Rejecting or Self-Involved Parents

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Distinguish between psychopathology and emotional immaturity, and establish how a disease concept model can impede therapeutic progress.
  2. Demonstrate practical communication skills that clients can use to protect themselves and redirect interactions with emotionally immature people.
  3. Utilize cognitive and emotional techniques to teach clients how they can set boundaries without feeling guilty.
  4. Employ interventions that help clients regain self-trust and the ability to identify emotionally immature control maneuvers.
  5. Formulate a treatment strategy that teaches clients how to evade attempts to undermine their mental freedom, inner-world connection, sense of goodness, and ability to reach out to others.
  6. Apply effective therapy approaches to release clients from emotional coercion and self-doubt in emotionally immature relationships.

Outline

Spotting Emotional Immaturity: Teach Clients to Understand Emotional Immaturity

  • Importance of describing over diagnosing
  • Projective identification and the Emotionally Immature Relationship System
  • Characteristics of emotional immaturity and maturity
  • What relationships feel like with emotionally immature people
How Emotionally Immature Parenting Impacts Your Clients: What You Can Expect When They Come for Therapy
  • Emotional loneliness and the fear of non-being
  • Good coping, emotional suffering; polyvagal effects
  • Self-disconnection and distrust of the inner world
  • The four horsemen of self-defeat
  • Loss of emotional autonomy and mental freedom
  • Healing fantasies, role-self, internalizer vs. externalizer styles
Cognitive and Emotional Techniques: What Works and What Doesn’t
  • Why clients find it so hard to break free from exploitation and emotional neglect
  • Why CBT and psychodynamic approaches aren’t enough
  • Exercises to help clients express themselves without anxiety
  • Teach clients to simultaneously disengage and become relationship leaders
  • How to define and use values as guideposts for the future
  • Phrasing suggestions, encouraging agency and showing how it’s done
End Emotional Takeovers and Coercion: Help Clients Achieve Emotional Autonomy from Emotionally Immature People
  • The emotionally immature person’s “distortion field”
  • Emotional coercion: how clients can spot and deflect control maneuvers
  • Communication skills to establish boundaries without guilt
  • When to sever ties with someone
Release Self-Doubt, Shame, and Fear: Clinical Tools and Interventions to Help Clients Find Their True Selves
  • Techniques to release clients’ feelings of personal “badness”
  • Interventions to address fears of being selfish and incapable of love
  • Tuning into energy shifts to track safety, unreliability, and threat in others
  • Repurpose self-doubt, shame, fear and guilt
  • Practicing experiencing emotionally intimate connection
Practice Tips for Working with the Adult Children of Emotionally Immature Parents
  • Using countertransference effectively
  • Honoring personal style
  • Invitation, collaboration and celebration vs. direction and persuasion
  • How to phrase suggestions
  • Research and treatment limitations

Copyright : 11/10/2020

Narcissistic and Psychopathic Abuse: The Clinicians' Guide to the New Field of Traumatic Pathological Love Relationships

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Justify why differentiating Pathological Love Relationships and narcissistic abuse from other domestic violence, addictive, co-dependent, or dysfunctional relationships is important to effective trauma treatment.
  2. Analyze the unique relational dynamics generated from the pathology and the traumatic impact to intimate partners
  3. Investigate the five stages of a Pathological Love Relationship (narcissistic abuse).
  4. Apply the DSM5 Alternative Model personality disorder ‘four impairments’ to predict relational deficits in narcissistic abuse.
  5. Investigate co-morbid and intensification factors related to behavior of the narcissistic abuser.
  6. Assess the role of chronic and pervasive Cognitive Dissonance in survivor symptomology.

Outline

Pathological Love Relationships

  • Pathological Love Relationship (PLR) definition
  • PLR theory and its influences from other fields and disciplines
  • Differentiating these relationships and abusers from others
  • Research and treatment limitations
Personality Disorders and Their Application to Pathological Love Relationships
  • How to spot a Pathological Love Relationship
  • Identifying Pathological Love Relationships through personality and personality disorders
  • The DSM Alternative Model about personality disorders and interpersonal risk
  • Significance of partner pathology as ‘pervasive’ and the relevance to survivor’s understanding
  • Problems identifying Pathological Love Relationships
  • How to identify relational pathology from the DSM-5 four impairments
Relational Dynamics and Stages of PLRs
  • DSM descriptions used as one of the identifiers in spotting a Pathological Love Relationship
  • Stages of Pathological Love Relationships
  • Pre-Stage— trolling, luring and predatory targeting tactics
  • Early Stage— manufactured intensity and reflective relational tactics
  • Mid-Phase —when the mask slips
  • End relationship dynamics
Survivor Personalities and Targeted Traits:
Critical Considerations for Prevention, Intervention, and Treatment
  • Who these survivors are NOT
  • Survivor personality super trait elevations and its importance in targeting and recovery
    • Agreeableness and cooperation: the relationship investment trait
    • Conscientiousness and self-directedness: the integrity-oriented life traits
  • Misidentification/misdiagnosis of personality ‘Super Traits’
  • Codependency, dependent PD, borderline PD, empaths
Trauma Symptoms and the Aftermath of Narcissistic Abuse:
Atypical Presentations of Trauma and Keys to Treating the Survivor
  • How these survivor’s symptoms can be different
  • ‘Atypical’ trauma and misdiagnosis
  • Cognitive dissonance and its presentation in survivors
  • Difference in chronic and persistent CD— not your college understanding
  • Cognitive dissonance and its connection to PTSD intensification
  • Trauma treatment and further treatment issues

Copyright : 01/15/2021

Demystifying Personality Disorders: Clinical Skills for Working with Drama and Manipulation

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Differentiate among the various clinical personality disorder DSM categories.
  2. Evaluate how transference and countertransference occurs in therapy sessions with personality disorder clients.
  3. Clinically assess for the nature of “drama” that personality disorder diagnosed clients create.
  4. Determine how this challenging client population can exploit the vulnerabilities of others.
  5. Demonstrate two key strategies of “drama non-participation” that clinicians can teach their clients who are impacted by the personality disorder diagnosed partner/family member.
  6. Demonstrate how re-defining the therapeutic approach can improve treatment outcomes.

Outline

Part I – Gregory W. Lester, Ph.D.
The Challenge of Personality Disorder

  • The core of the personality disorder: the unchanging agenda
  • The DSM-5® personality disorders and their agendas:
    • Schizotypal
    • Narcissistic
    • Antisocial (and Psychopaths!)
    • Borderline
    • Avoidant
    • Obsessive-Compulsive
    • Trait Specified (PDTS) What is that?
    • General criteria for personality disorders
    • Levels of personality functioning
    • Personality trait domains
Overcome Common Clinician Struggles
  • Transference & countertransference
  • What does transference and countertransference look like in our work?
  • Boundary crossings and boundary violations
  • How to tell when you are headed for disaster and how to intervene
Part II – Alan Godwin, Psy.D.
Techniques to Counter Manipulation & Empower Victims to Become Survivors
  • Recognize the manipulation process
  • Re-structure cognitive distortions
  • Create healthy boundaries and set limits
  • Respond instead of react
  • Make direct requests, expect direct responses
  • Judge actions, not intentions
  • Explore their own vulnerabilities and identify risk factors
  • Acknowledge relational limitations
  • Resources for ongoing support
Maximize Therapeutic Gains with a Manipulative Client
  • Accurately assess your client’s personality characteristics
  • Re-define your therapeutic approach
  • 5 signs your client is manipulating you
  • Techniques to manage thinking errors and manipulative tactics
Strategies for Common Therapyinterfering Behaviors
  • Manage countertransference
  • Handle boundary violations
  • Stay calm when your buttons are pushed – and carry on!

Copyright : 02/24/2021

Emotional Abusive Behaviors and A Closer Look at Gaslighting: Clinical Tools to Break the Cycle of Manipulation and Regain Personal Power

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Analyze how gaslighting in the context of romantic relationships, friendships, and family relationships can lead to long term effects like trauma, anxiety and depression.
  2. Employ in-session approaches to help clients become aware of gaslighting behavior in their lives and recognize the consequences.
  3. Differentiate gaslighting from other forms of emotional abuse to improve your ability to recognize the subtle signs that clients may be victims.
  4. Employ body-based approaches to help clients who have experienced gaslighting validate their experience and rebuild trust in themselves.
  5. Utilize techniques from a variety of therapeutic approaches to unravel problematic beliefs that can prevent victims of gaslighting from making therapeutic progress.

Outline

Gaslighting in Relationships and Society

  • Define what gaslighting is in measurable terms
  • Review of term Gaslighting
  • Romantic/intimate relationships
  • Friendships
  • Family relationships
  • Work
  • How gaslighting shows up on a larger scale: social media and advertising
  • Gaslighting and communal trauma in minority groups
Signs and Side Effects of Gaslighting
  • How this shows up for our clients
  • Loss of self-confidence
  • Emotional disturbance
  • Increased vulnerability to emotional abuse
  • Decreased autonomy
  • Increased risk of codependency
  • Retraumatizing survivors of abuse and trauma
Clinical Approaches
  • Review of Evidence-based treatments
  • Insight and self-awareness – how to help clients recognize gaslighting in their lives
    • Self-forgiveness and compassion techniques to heal from shame and interrupt self-criticism
    • Body-based approaches to help clients validate their experience and rebuild trust in themselves
    • Assertiveness training — teach clients to express needs clearly, directly, and openly
    • 5 steps to help clients set healthier boundaries
    • Teach clients to identify traits of healthy relationships
    • Unravel problematic beliefs with
    • IFS, DBT, narrative therapy and somatic experiencing techniques
    • Research limitations

Copyright : 02/01/2021