Full Course Description


Managing Patient Emergencies​​

 

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Describe two types of rapid assessment techniques and how to employ them for the best results during a patient emergency.
  2. Evaluate techniques for getting critical information during a rapid patient assessment.
  3. Investigate EARLY assessment findings in clinical syndromes that may progress rapidly and cause life-threatening conditions.
  4. Prioritize nursing actions for specific neurological, cardiac, respiratory and endocrine emergencies.
  5. Review care of the diabetic patient in diabetic ketoacidosis.
  6. Identify patient populations who are at high-risk for bedside emergencies.
  7. Discuss how to integrate assessment data and critical lab findings into the plan of care for a patient experiencing a life-threatening emergency.

Outline

Identifying the RED Flags

  • Critical Thinking During a Crisis
  • Vital Signs & ABCDs
  • Methods for Establishing and Maintaining Airway
    • Breathing: More Than a Rate Issue
    • Circulation & Perfusion
    • Rapid Assessment Techniques
    • Critical Questions to Ask Your Patient
    • Identifying High-Risk Populations
    • Sick or Not Sick…Who would you see first?

Cardiovascular

Prevention, Presentation, Action for: “I’m having chest pain”

  • Recognizing Arrhythmias - Stable, Unstable and Lethal
  • Rhythm Recognition & Treatment for: VT, VF, SVT, and Heart Blocks
  • Acute Myocardial Infarction: STEMI/NSTEMI
  • Key Assessments & Interventions
  • tPA Guidelines
  • Laboratory Parameters
  • Recognizing Subtle Changes
  • Hemodynamic Monitoring:
    • MAP, CO, SV, CI
    • Preload, Afterload, Contractility
  • Skills Practice: EKG Interpretation

Respiratory

Prevention, Presentation, Action for: “I can’t breathe”

  • Capnography Basics
  • Assessment & Critical Interventions for:
  • Pulmonary Embolism
  • Respiratory Failure
  • COPD
  • ARDS
  • The Patient Who Needs Assistance
  • O2, CPAP, BiPAP
  • Indications for Intubation
  • Positive Pressure Ventilation
  • Chest Tube Management
  • Easy ABG Analysis…Really!

Endocrine

Prevention, Presentation, Action for: “I don’t feel right”

  • The Differences of DKA and HHNK
  • Early Recognition of Hypoglycemia
  • Critical Lab Findings
  • Differentiating the Diagnosis – Case Studies
    • Which Intervention Should you do FIRST
    • What is the Likely Problem
    • Anticipating the Solutions

Neurological

Prevention, Presentation and Action for: “My head hurts!”

  • Elevated Intracranial Pressure
  • Clues When you Don’t have a Monitor
  • Ischemic vs. Hemorrhagic Stroke
  • Inclusion/Exclusion for tPA
  • Critical Labs
  • Malignant Headache
  • Delirium
  • Autonomic Dysreflexia
  • Simulation Lab Review
    • Interpreting the Patient’s Presentation

Fluid Imbalance/Circulatory Emergencies

  • Sepsis
  • Shock
  • GI Bleed
  • Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
  • Compartment Syndrome

Managing the Decompensating Patient

  • No Pulse, No Blood Pressure, No Respirations...Now What?
    • Common Medications
    • Monitor/Defibrillator Review
    • Roles & Responsibilities During a Code

What’s New & Trending

  • Ethical Considerations
  • Documentation Pitfalls
  • Staffing Considerations & High Acuity Patients

Copyright : 10/19/2017

Impending Doom: Crisis Prevention and Management in the Deteriorating Patient

Program Information

Outline

Sepsis Crisis

  • What are the 3 most likely causes of a sepsis crisis
  • Three cardinal signs of sepsis
  • Understanding diagnostic tests to differentiate sepsis from other possibilities
  • Summary of the current evidence-based findings
  • Complications of illness

Cardiovascular Crisis

(Acute MI, Cardiogenic Shock, Pulmonary edema, TIA/CVA)

  • What are the common causes of all cardiovascular diseases
  • Symptomology differences between genders in cardiovascular disease
  • Examination clues that help you recognize a cardiovascular crisis
  • What diagnostic tests, labs, x-ray, imaging can help with diagnosis of a CV emergency
  • Nurse’s role managing a cardiovascular crisis

Anaphalaxis Crisis

  • Do you know the typical causes of anaphalaxis?
  • Signs/symptoms to look for in patients experiencing anaphalaxis
  • What quick nursing actions can save your patient’s life in anaphalaxis?
  • Medications that can avert an anaphalaxis crisis

Diabetic Crisis

(Ketoacidosis, Hyperosmolar Syndrome)

  • Key differences between ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar syndrome
  • What subtle signs do patients display when heading towards a diabetic crisis?
  • Important labs that give clues in diabetic crisis and its resolution
  • What nursing skills are important to help reduce diabetic crisis complications?

Pulmonary Crisis

(Status Asthmaticus, Acute Respiratory Failure)

  • Identify causes that can lead to a pulmonary crisis
  • Are all breath sounds alike?
  • When asthma is no longer simple
  • Which patients are likely to develop acute respiratory failure - and what can you do about it?

Hypovolemic Crisis

(GI bleed, Trauma, Internal Bleeding)

  • Causes of hypovolemic shock that you will encounter
  • When anxiety, restlessness, agitation and confusion are not a mental health problem
  • Are there earlier signs than hypotension that signal a hypovolemic crisis?
  • Fluids, Fluids, Fluids. Fluid resuscitation can save a life.

Rapid Response Teams

  • Effective use of the RRT in a clinical crisis
  • When to utilize the RRT
  • What team members are needed on RRT

Objectives

  1. Recognize and distinguish the early clinical signs and symptoms of impending doom.
  2. Assess the deteriorating patient using rapid and focused strategies.
  3. Explain the unique and time-sensitive needs for patients experiencing cardiac, pulmonary, infectious, diabetic and shock clinical crisis.
  4. Evaluate optimal use of rapid response teams.
  5. Differentiate between the diagnostic tests used in the deteriorating patient.
  6. Apply current treatments for patients in clinical crisis using case studies.

Copyright : 11/14/2017