Full Course Description


The Aging Brain: Assessments, Treatments & Interventions for Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias

Program Information

Outline

Mental Health Evaluation

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Alcohol Abuse
Cognitive Disorder and “Forgetfulness”
  • Transient Cognitive Decline
  • Pre-cursor to dementia
  • Mild Neuro-Cognitive Disorder
Diagnostics of Dementing Conditions
  • Alzheimer’s
  • Vascular
  • Parkinson’s
  • Lewy Body
  • Frontotemporal
  • Passengers on the bus metaphor
  • Reversible Conditions
Cognitive Assessment Tools
  • Mini-Mental State Examination
  • SLUMS
  • Clinical applications
  • Administration and scoring
  • Objective and subjective interpretation
  • Therapy modalities
Differentiate Dementia and Depression
  • Clinical indicators of depression and anxiety
  • Practical application
Psychopharmacology
  • Early and Mid-stage Alzheimer’s – Acetylcholinesterace inhibitors
  • Mid and Late-stage Alzheimer’s – Neurotransmitter Glutamate
  • Alternate interventions
Behavioral Interventions
  • Intervention strategies for depression, poor appetite, verbal and physical combativeness, refusing ADL care
  • Strategies for coping mechanisms for the caregiver and clinician
Working with Caregivers at Home
  • Caregiver guilt
  • Depression
Ethics
  • Responsibility to patient
  • Reporting abuse
  • Power of Attorney
  • Documentation

Objectives

  1. Analyze the impact of dementia on brain structure and function, and determine the difference between “normal forgetfulness” and cognitive impairment.
  2. Diagnose dementias, including Alzheimer’s disease, by accurately identifying manifestations of each type and understand how these differences impact prognosis in older adults.
  3. Articulate differences between the Folstein Mini-Mental Status examination, SLUMS, and MOCA and effectively utilize them as screening measure tools for cognitive impairment and dementia.
  4. Employ adaptable behavioral interventions that can provide patients with individualized care and promote more effective participation in therapy.
  5. Investigate the concept of caregiver guilt and its implications for the client, clinicians, and those caring for older adults with dementia.
  6. Correlate patients’ strengths and limitations to potential therapeutic approaches when developing treatment plans for older adults with dementia.

Copyright : 08/02/2018

Cognitive Therapy for Dementia: Effective Evaluation & Therapeutic Interventions

  • Differentiation of Dementias
  • Etiology of Various Dementias
  • Staging Dementia & Clinical Interventions
  • System Models of Memory & Their Relationship to Dementia
  • Medicare Compliance, Medical Necessity & Jimmo v. Sebelius
  • Evidenced-based Direct & Indirect Therapeutic Interventions
  • iPad® Applications for Cognitive Therapy

This invaluable workshop focuses on the variables associated with learning for cognitively impaired patients. You will learn the characteristics of dementia for effective differentiation as well as how to accurately stage your patients. Take away an array of therapeutic approaches based on the patient’s diagnosis and stage level for successful intervention. This seminar will broaden your understanding of memory and pharmacology and provide evidence-based direct and indirect interventions to help you find the right approach for each patient. Additionally, you will discover how to fully comply with the recent Medicare policies and how these changes will impact treatment of your patients.

Key benefits:

  • Differentiate cortical and sub-cortical, static and dynamic, and reversible cognitive impairment
  • Determine the patient’s stages of dementia to modify intervention practices
  • Differentiate the forms of memory and the dementia diagnosis associated with each form
  • Document cognitive therapy for adult patients with dementia in accordance with Medicare guidelines
  • Utilize peer reviewed research regarding treatment strategies
  • Explain environmental adaptations utilized for the patient with dementia
  • Utilize visual cues during therapy to facilitate memory
  • Understand Jimmo v. Sebelius implications for therapy

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Communicate the differences between cortical and sub-cortical dementias.
  2. Evaluate and accurately stage the patient with cognitive impairment to inform clinical treatment interventions.
  3. Discriminate the forms of memory and the dementia diagnosis associated with each form.
  4. Utilize an appropriate iPad® application for cognitive therapy.
  5. Articulate one functional long-term goal and two functional short-term goals for cognitive therapy.
  6. Implement the appropriate therapeutic intervention strategies for different cognitive impairments.

Outline

Differentiation of Dementias
  • Cortical & Sub-cortical
  • Static or Dynamic/Reversible
Etiology of Various Dementias
  • Alzheimer’s
  • Parkinson’s
  • Vascular Dementia
  • Huntington’s
  • Lewy Body
  • Frontotemporal Dementia
  • Wilson’s
  • PSP
  • Cerebral Degeneration
  • Basil Ganglia Degeneration
 
Stages of Dementia/Clinical Staging
Identification of Models of Memory & Their Relationship to Dementia
  • Etiology & Symptoms
    • Sensory Memory
    • Working Memory
    • Declarative Memory
  • Non-declarative Memory
Medicare Compliance, Medical Necessity, Goal Writing
  • Jimmo v. Sebelius – Impact on treatment
Evaluation Tests
  • Brief Cognitive Rating Scale
  • Global Deterioration Scale
  • St. Louis University Mental Status Test (SLUMS)
  • Stroop Test
  • Trails A & B
  • Cognitive Linguistic Quick Test
  • Scales of Cognitive and Communication Ability for Neurorehab (SCCAN)
  • Environmental and Communication Assessment Toolkit for Dementia (ECAT )
  • MCI Screen
  • Allen Crosswalk & Cognitive Levels
Direct Therapeutic Interventions for Dementia
  • Spaced Retrieval
  • Priming
  • Reminiscence Therapy
  • Medications
  • Montessori Principles
  • Allen’s Techniques
  • Chaining Techniques
  • Attention Training Techniques
  • Sensory Stimulation Techniques
  • Errorless Learning Techniques
  • Meta-memory Exercises
  • Cognitive Rehab Dining
  • Appropriate iPad® Apps for Cognitive Therapy
Indirect Therapeutic Interventions for Dementia
  • Environmental Adaptations
  • Assistive Techniques for Cognition
  • Simulated Presence Therapy
  • Linguistic Manipulations
  • External Aids
  • Caregiver Education

Copyright : 01/22/2016

Pathways to Successful Aging! The 5 Key Factors to Age Well with Dr. John Arden

Dr. John Arden, neuropsychologist, author, a pioneer in brain-based therapy, and Director of Training in Mental Health for Kaiser Permanente for Northern California. This recording highlights the five key factors that support successful aging.

The baby boomer generation is soon to explode into the healthcare scene. As a healthcare professional you will be asked to help the aging population in new, lower cost, and easy-to-achieve methods to slow down dementia and other age-related diseases.

Dr. John Arden spent four decades working successfully to help ordinary people with various mental and physical health conditions.

He discovered a number of years ago that if he explained in easy terms how their brains work, how the simple things they can do to alter their brain functioning, their physical functioning and their prospects of aging healthfully, positive results took place!

In this 2-hour voyage into your brain, and Dr. John Arden will show you these 5 key factors for aging successfully- and how you can best explain them to your clients!

  1. Social support - linked to wellbeing, cognition and longevity
  2. Physical activity - neurogenesis, reduction of inflammation, normalization of blood glucose and enhancement of cell repair
  3. Lifelong pursuit of new learning - reduced risk of cognitive decline or dementia
  4. Healthy diet tips - key neurotransmitters, protects the brain from rapid aging, Type 2 diabetes, cognitive decline and dementia.
  5. Quality sleep supports memory consolidation, brain glucose metabolic activity, and cognition
Copyright : 09/12/2014