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Your patients and their families count on you to have the knowledge, skill, and expertise to care for their non-healing, complex, and chronic wounds. Even when the healing journey is difficult — you bring your best every day… and you are making a difference!

But, between non-compliant patients, stubborn infections, and complex, slow-healing wounds, it's easy to feel defeated.

If you want to manage complex wounds, affirm your expertise in wound care, help your patients heal, and provide individualized and ethical care, this comprehensive course is for you.

Engage with expert faculty, Laura Swoboda, NP, APNP, FNP-C, FNP-BC, CWOCN-AP®, WOCNF, and Nilma Z. Elias Santiago, PT, DPT, WCC, CLT, OMS, who will share invaluable clinical insights you can use to differentiate types of wounds, select the best dressing for healing, recognize and treat infection, provide nutritional counseling, and more.

You'll walk away with actionable, evidence-based techniques to tackle the most stubborn and hard-to-heal wounds, from chronic pressure injuries to diabetic foot ulcers.

Here are just a few of the questions you will find answers for:

  • Those very puzzling wound presentations… when is it an atypical wound?
  • Can you really control biofilm growth in wounds?
  • Which of these fancy new dressings should I use on this wound?
  • How can I prevent ostomy skin breakdown?
  • How do I ensure I provide ethical and defensible wound care?
  • What foods work best to heal wounds?
  • What happens when a wound will not heal?
  • And many, many more!
Plus, this course meets all requirements to earn Wound Care Certification from Evergreen — an additional $299.99 value!

Take the next step in your wound care career today Register now!

Evergreen
By achieving "Wound Care Certification," you distinguish yourself as an expert with a commitment to the highest standards in wound care. Evergreen Certification demonstrates that you have the expertise to provide a consistent level of high-quality wound care. Display you certification with pride!
Comprehensive Wound Care Certification Course

$1,539.83 Value
Just For You: Only $149.99 — Unbelievable Savings!
Plus, earn up to 19.75 CE Hours included in the course tuition.
Click here for CE credit details | Click here for course objectives and outline
What you will get:

  • Latest evidence and guidelines from APWCA, WOCN, WHS, NPIAP, and more!
  • Management strategies for venous, arterial, diabetic wounds, and more
  • Latest advancements and innovative approaches in wound care
  • Earn valuable CE (up to 19.75 CE hours) to help meet your ongoing education requirements
  • Enhance your professional credentials as a CWCP!
If you're ready to take the next step in your wound care journey… this comprehensive course is for you!

Our On-Demand Package includes full access to session handouts and presentation slides, as well as all these key features:

  • Unlimited access to all sessions
  • Watch the videos at your own pace and schedule
  • Completely flexible learning for your busy schedule
  • Includes your Evergreen Wound Care Certification* — a $299.99 value
Earn Your Certification When You Finish The Course!

Meet Your Faculty

Laura Swoboda
Laura Swoboda, NP, APNP, FNP-C, FNP-BC, CWOCN-AP®, WOCNF, is a nurse practitioner and wound care coordinator at Froedtert Menomonee Falls Hospital in Menomonee Falls, WI. She is a board member of the Association for the Advancement of Wound Care, serves on the editorial board of the Wound Care Learning Network, and serves on the National Pressure Injury Advisory Panel, Inc.

Click here for information about Laura Swoboda


Nilma Z. Elias Santiago
Nilma Z. Elias Santiago, PT, DPT, WCC, CLT, OMS, is a licensed physical therapist, a board-certified wound care specialist, a certified lymphedema therapist, and a certified ostomy management specialist. With over ten years of experience in wound care, she opened a private wound care practice in Florida that offers lymphedema, ostomy, and wound care services. Dr. Santiago is also an adjunct faculty member of AT Still University in Mesa, Arizona, teaching physical therapists that are completing their post-professional doctorate in physical therapy. She has written articles published in healthcare magazines and presented a poster at the World Confederation of Physical Therapy in 2007, and in the 2018 Summit of the Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

Click here for information about Nilma Z. Elias Santiago
Comprehensive Wound Care Certification Course

$1,539.83 Value
Just For You: Only $149.99 — Unbelievable Savings!
Plus, earn up to 19.75 CE Hours included in the course tuition.
Click here for CE credit details | Click here for course objectives and outline
Here's a Detailed Breakdown of What's Included in This Training:

Skin Assessment and Documentation
Everything you need to know about assessing wounds and documenting your findings. Anatomy and physiology of the skin, age specific skin assessment, skin damage and wound healing.

Wound assessment and documentation are important components of a patient encounter. The wound assessment guides treatment. Documentation of that assessment informs the patient and treatment team, is a legal record, and helps support the coverage for supplies and advanced therapies. A thorough wound assessment is the foundation of wound care, a critical skill for all healthcare professionals.

Objectives

  1. Describe the anatomy and physiology of the skin as they relate to skin function.
  2. Explain age specific changes in skin and skin function.
  3. Identify types of skin damage and phases of wound healing.
  4. List components and findings of wound assessment.

Outline

Anatomy and physiology of the skin as they relate to skin function
  • Review wound healing process
  • List and describe types of tissue damage
  • Describe where wounds become stalled

Age specific changes in skin and skin function
  • Considerations of skin changes and wound/ tissue types

Components and findings of wound assessment
  • How to measure a wound
  • Tissue types
  • Periwound
  • Drainage
  • Wound edges
  • Wound types

Wound Diagnosis and Wound Types
Partial-thickness wound and a full-thickness wound, wound healing stages, different types of wounds (abrasions, avulsions, excoriation, leg ulcers, incisions, skin tears, lacerations, puncture wounds), arterial, venous, diabetic, and neuropathic ulcers.

Making a wound diagnosis is complex… and so important to get correct! In this session, a deep dive into wound thickness, characteristics of wounds, and etiologies of wounds will be presented… making sure you get the diagnosis right and initiate the most appropriate management plan.

Objectives

  1. Differentiate between a partial-thickness wound and a full-thickness wound.
  2. Review wound healing stages.
  3. Identify different types of wounds (abrasions, avulsions, excoriation, leg ulcers, incisions, skin tears, lacerations, puncture wounds).
  4. Compare arterial, venous, diabetic, and neuropathic ulcers.

Outline

Wound Thickness and Diagnosis
  • Partial-thickness wound
  • Full-thickness wound
Wound healing stages — Characteristics of Types of Wounds
  • Abrasions
  • Avulsions
  • Excoriation
  • Leg ulcers
  • Incisions
  • Skin tears
  • Lacerations
  • Puncture wounds
Etiology of Wounds
  • Arterial
  • Venous
  • Diabetic
  • Neuropathic ulcers

Diabetic Foot Ulcers
Impact… prevalence, costs, patient morbidity, and legal implications, patients and conditions at risk of DFU, actions you can take to prevent and treat DFUs in the community.

Diabetic foot ulcers are a major source of morbidity and mortality, and the number one cause of non-traumatic amputation. Identifying and treating diabetic foot ulcers properly ensures this growing patient population has the best outcomes possible. Hear the latest information on diabetic foot ulcers and help prevent and manage them.

Objectives

  1. Provide an overview of diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) impact including prevalence, associated costs, patient morbidity, and legal implications.
  2. Identify the causes of DFU.
  3. Identify patients and conditions at risk of DFU.
  4. List common, accessible interventions for DFU prevention and treatment in the community.

Outline

Review diabetic foot ulcer and PAD
  • Incidence
  • Prevalence
  • Risk factors
Discuss amputation risk
  • Prevalence
  • Disparity
  • Mortality
  • Community prevention interventions
Review assessment findings
  • Location
  • Neuropathy
  • Vascular findings
  • Wound assessment findings

Pressure Injuries
Etiology, prevalence, common sites, and risk factors, staging a pressure injury, moisture-associated skin damage, different pressure injury risk assessment tools, management, pressure injury management approaches, and pressure relief.

Pressure Injuries: The Latest Guidelines

Keeping up with the literature on pressure injuries is always a challenge for busy clinicians. In this session, we will cover a range of topics including epidemiology, staging, risk assessment, management, and pressure relief. This information will help clinicians incorporate new data into their clinical practice.

Objectives

  1. Determine the etiology, prevalence, common sites, and risk factors for pressure injuries.
  2. Differentiate between stages of pressure injuries and moisture-associated skin damage.
  3. Implement different pressure injury risk assessment tools.
  4. Discuss pressure injury management approaches.
  5. Discuss preventative measures and the importance of pressure relief.

Outline

Overview of Pressure Injuries
  • Etiology of pressure injuries
  • Prevalence
  • Risk factors of developing pressure injuries
  • Common sites
Risk Assessment and Stages of pressure injuries
  • Risk Assessment Tools
  • Stages of pressure injuries
  • Moisture-associated skin damage
Management Approaches — Preventative measures and the importance of pressure relief
  • Air mattresses
  • Dressings
  • Cushion
Case study

Venous Leg Ulcers
Anatomy and physiology, etiology, and clinical presentation. Gold standard treatment for venous ulcers and other treatment options including dressings.

A Comprehensive Approach to Venous Leg Ulcers

The most common causes of lower extremity wounds are venous and arterial insufficiency, both leading to vascular ulcers that are difficult to manage. In this session, we will review the etiology, risk factors, and clinical presentation of both arterial and venous ulcers. A deep dive into diagnostic tests and measures, as well as interventions and treatment options, will be included. You will walk away with the latest advancements and evidence-based treatments to provide the best possible care to your patients.

Objectives

  1. Review the anatomy and physiology of the arterial and venous system.
  2. Identify risk factors and etiology for vascular ulcers.
  3. Identify the clinical presentation of arterial and venous ulcers.
  4. Select appropriate tests and measures to assist in differential diagnosis of vascular insufficiency.
  5. Discuss different interventions and treatment options to manage leg vascular ulcers.

Outline

Anatomy and physiology
  • Arterial system
  • Venous system
  • Risk factors
  • Etiology
Clinical presentation
  • Arterial ulcer
  • Venous ulcers
Diagnosis and management
  • Diagnostic tests and measures
  • Interventions and treatment options

Atypical Wounds
Definition and prevalence, how do you know it's atypical, common atypical diagnosis, inflammatory ulcers and cancerous lesions, and special considerations.

Atypical ulcers, such as calcinosis cutis, calciphylaxis, pyoderma gangrenosum, vasculitis, skin cancer, fungating tumors, and more are due to alternative etiologies and more challenging to manage than most chronic wounds. This presentation reviews the clinical presentation and treatment of several atypical wounds including red flags in the identification of wounds that may be caused by atypical factors. Completion of the presentation will leave attendees with an understanding of atypical ulcers to maximize positive outcomes for patients.

Objectives

  1. Identify what types of wounds are considered atypical and their prevalence.
  2. Determine history and presenting signs or symptoms that may signal atypical ulcer etiology.
  3. Describe commonly encountered atypical diagnosis including inflammatory ulcers and cancerous lesions.
  4. List special considerations for atypical ulcer plans of care.

Outline

Review atypical ulcers
  • Prevalence and incidence
  • Definition
Review typical and atypical wound assessment findings
  • Tissue types
  • Edges
  • Types of atypical wounds
Review clinical presentation and treatment of a subset of atypical wounds
  • Calcinosis cutis
  • Infectious ulcers
  • Cancerous lesions

Ostomy Skin Care
Types of diversions, types of stoma, peristomal complications and interventions, different types of appliances, and teaching the family.

Ostomy Management and Skin Care

This session provides an overview on the several types of stomas, with a focus on colostomies and ileostomies. It includes an overview of management, complications, and types of appliances.

Objectives

  1. Review the anatomy and physiology of the digestive system.
  2. Identify the types of diversions and stomas.
  3. Review stoma assessment.
  4. Describe peristomal complications and describe the interventions.
  5. Differentiate types of ostomy appliances and provide recommendations based on case studies.

Outline

Digestive system
  • Anatomy
  • Physiology
Surgical Corrections
  • Types of diversions
  • Types of stomas
  • Stoma assessment
  • Peristomal complications and describe the interventions
Types of appliances
  • Recommendations based on case studies

Advanced Wound Therapies
The benefits and mechanisms of action of various methods of delivering negative pressure wound therapy, cellular tissue product terminology and classifications, connection between mechanobiology, biofilm, and energy therapies in chronic wounds, and hyperbaric and transcutaneous oxygen therapies.

With so many existing and emerging treatment modalities to expedite wound healing in acute and chronic wounds, it is difficult to keep up with them all. This presentation reviews the mechanism of action, patient selection, and usage of various methods of advanced wound treatment including negative pressure wound therapy, transcutaneous and hyperbaric oxygen, grafts and matrices, autologous treatments, and energy therapies. Completion of the presentation will leave attendees with an understanding of adjunctive interventions to use in combination with biofilm-based wound bed preparation to maximize positive outcomes for patients.

Objectives

  1. Identify benefits and mechanisms of action of various methods of delivering negative pressure wound therapy.
  2. Describe cellular tissue product terminology and classifications.
  3. Breakdown the connection between mechanobiology, biofilm, and energy therapies in chronic wounds.
  4. Compare patient presentations for consideration of hyperbaric and transcutaneous oxygen therapies.

Outline

Considerations for advanced therapy selection
  • Healing process stages
  • Wound and periwound tissue assessment
  • Wound type
  • Insurance considerations
Principles of advanced therapy usage
  • Wound bed preparation
Mechanism of action and usage of advanced wound therapies
  • Negative pressure wound therapy
  • Transcutaneous and hyperbaric oxygen
  • Grafts and matrices
  • Autologous treatments
  • Energy therapies

Wound Hygiene
Stages of wound healing and how this relates to wound hygiene management strategies, four simple steps of a wound hygiene protocol, cytotoxicity as it relates to cleansing agents, and evidence-based concepts of moist wound healing.

Wound hygiene is an evidence-based treatment concept that combines wound bed preparation with biofilm-based wound management to optimize healing outcomes. In this session, the processes of cleansing, debriding, refashioning wound edges, and finally choosing a dressing for wounds will be covered. A knowledge of safe and effective choices to accomplish each of these steps allows healthcare professionals to maximize wound healing potential.

Objectives

  1. Describe stages of wound healing and how this relates to wound hygiene management strategies.
  2. Discuss the four simple steps of a wound hygiene protocol.
  3. Describe the concept of cytotoxicity as it relates to cleansing agents.
  4. List evidence-based concepts of moist wound healing.

Outline

Stages of wound healing and how this relates to wound hygiene management strategies.
  • Hemostasis
  • Inflammation
  • Proliferative
  • Remodeling
Four simple steps of a wound hygiene protocol
  • Cleanse
  • Debride
  • Refashion
  • Dress
Concept of cytotoxicity as it relates to cleansing agents
  • Define cytotoxicity
  • Compare cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic cleansing choices
  • Review hypochlorous acid
Evidence-based concepts of moist wound healing
  • List benefits of moist wound healing
  • Describe 2 complication of topical antibiotic usage
  • Review complications from gauze dressing usage

Biofilm and Wound Infection
Impact of bioburden and biofilm on the wound environment, culture indications and how to perform a wound culture, evidence-based treatment interventions for biofilm and bioburden, and therapeutic window where antimicrobial dressings can be most effective.

Biofilm-based wound management is a core concept in the delivery of evidence-based care. By understanding the mechanisms of targeting biofilm, clinicians will be better equipped to disrupt its contribution to delayed wound healing and infection. Wound infection is a major source of morbidity and mortality as well as a significant contributor to antibiotic resistance making it a tremendous opportunity to reduce harm and improve outcomes for patients.

Objectives

  1. Discuss the impact of bioburden and biofilm on the wound environment.
  2. Determine culture indications and how to perform a wound culture.
  3. Describe evidence-based treatment interventions for biofilm and bioburden.
  4. Define the therapeutic window where antimicrobial dressings can be most effective.

Outline

Review biofilm
  • Identification
  • Prevalence
  • Impact of wound healing
  • Treatment
Special considerations
  • Probe to bone
  • Bacteria in healthy tissue v necrotic tissue
  • Culturing wounds
  • Fluorescence imaging
Treatment of Infection
  • Cellulitis
  • Review IDSA Skin and Soft tissue Infection Guidelines
  • Review IDSA Diabetic foot infection guidelines
  • Introduce Chronic Inhibitory Bacterial Load concept

Wound Dressings
Different types of dressings, uses of each type of dressing, appropriate dressing based on the wound assessment, and advantages and disadvantages of each dressing type.

Wound Dressings: Selecting the Best for Healing

Let's face it, dressing selection can be overwhelming because of the plethora of products that are in the wound care market space. Practical knowledge of dressing categories, functionality, appropriateness, and reimbursement is key in dressing selection. This session provides clinical guidance for selecting the most suitable wound dressings based on the type of and characteristics of wounds.

Objectives

  1. List the different types of dressings.
  2. Discuss the uses of each type of dressing.
  3. Evaluate the appropriate dressing based on the wound assessment.
  4. Describe the advantages and disadvantages of each dressing type.

Outline

Wound Dressings: Selecting the Best for Healing
  • Different types of dressings
  • Uses of each type of dressing
  • Appropriate dressing based on the wound assessment
Dressing Types
  • Advantages of each dressing type
  • Disadvantages of each dressing type
Recommendations of wound dressings base on case studies

Wound Debridement
Pathophysiologic indications for debridement, principles of debridement and their impact on safe and effective sharp debridement, and debridement forms and patient selection.

Debridement is a critical step of wound bed preparation to expedite healing and assist in the avoidance of negative outcomes associated with bioburden and biofilm. Clinicians have many options to accomplish debridement including sharp, conservative sharp, mechanical, enzymatic, biologic, chemical, and autolytic debridement. Removing necrotic tissue can not only impact the wound environment, but also quality of life. This session reviews the various forms of debridement as well as contraindication and precautions. Clinicians will be aware of key safety measures if performing conservative sharp wound debridement. The course concludes with a case compendium of debridement showcasing the multitudinous debridement options available.

Objectives

  1. Differentiate between debridement options including sharp, conservative sharp, mechanical, enzymatic, biologic, chemical, autolytic.
  2. Define the how debridement can impact the wound environment and quality of life.
  3. Discuss contraindications and precautions to debridement.
  4. Identify key safety measures when performing conservative sharp wound debridement.

Outline

Assessment considerations for debridement
  • Tissue types
  • Conditions
  • Disease states
  • Skin pathophysiology
Biophysical indications for debridement including
  • Biofilm
  • Bioburden
  • The healing cascade
Benefits, limitations, and usage of multiple debridement modalities including
  • Sharp
  • Conservative sharp
  • Mechanical
  • Enzymatic
  • Biologic
  • Chemical
  • Autolytic debridement
Case compendium of debridement accomplished utilizing multiple methods

Palliative Wound Care
Palliative wound care and what constitutes a palliative wound, common palliative care wound types, core management concepts of palliative wounds, and interventions to treat common complications seen in palliative wounds.

Palliative wound care utilizes mutual goal setting to maximize quality of life in patients where wound healing may not be the primary goal. Knowledge of pain management, decreased dressing change frequency, and infection prevention methods can facilitate successful outcomes in this specialized cohort of wound patients. Learn about the special considerations of palliative wound care including an increased emphasis on infection prevention, comfort, and pain management. In addition, hear which management strategies are contraindicated in certain palliative wound types to avoid complications.

Objectives

  1. Define palliative wound care and what constitutes a palliative wound.
  2. List common palliative care wound types.
  3. Describe core management concepts of palliative wounds.
  4. Determine interventions to treat common complications seen in palliative wounds.

Outline

Palliative wound care and what constitutes a palliative wound
  • When to choose palliative care
  • Wound healing v symptom palliation
  • How to prioritize symptom relief
Common palliative care wound types and review management considerations
  • Wound in patients with cancer
  • Fungating tumors
  • Cancerous wounds
  • Arterial ulcers
  • Non-adherence to medical plans of can in medically complex patients
  • Overwhelming comorbidities
Core management concepts of palliative wounds
  • Infection prevention
  • Pain reduction
  • Odor and drainage management

Professional Considerations
Ethical concerns encountered in wound management, culturally competent care and how to integrate cultural competence into the delivery of wound care, common legal issues encountered, and interventions in prevention. Interdisciplinary wound care team necessity for effective wound management.

Professional Considerations in Wound Management

Wound care has unique professional considerations for all members of the interdisciplinary team. In this session, you will learn how to navigate potential ethical issues, ensure you are providing culturally competent care, and how to avoid legal complications… all within a team environment.

Objectives

  1. Identify ethical concerns encountered in wound management.
  2. Define and integrate cultural competence into the delivery of wound care.
  3. Review scope of practice considerations.
  4. List common legal issues encountered and interventions in prevention.
  5. Discuss how an interdisciplinary wound care team is necessary for effective wound management.

Outline

Professional concerns in wound care
  • Ethical issues
  • Cultural competence into the delivery of wound care
  • Scope of practice considerations
  • Common legal issues encountered and interventions in prevention
Interdisciplinary wound care
  • Team approach
  • Effective wound management

Nutrition for Wound Healing
Prevalence of nutritional insufficiency and its impact on wound healing, nutritional recommendations for wound patients and their limitations, end-stage renal disease patient population, nutritional laboratory findings, and patient indications for surveillance.

Nutrition and Wound Healing Nutrition is a critical factor in wound healing. It can lead to both the development of wounds and delayed wound healing. Wound patients are at increased risk of malnutrition from a variety of sources. This session reviews the specific physiologic use of micro and macro nutrients in addition to nutritional assessment techniques to identify and correct deficiencies in the wound patient.

Objectives

  1. Discuss the prevalence of nutritional insufficiency and its impact on wound healing.
  2. List nutritional recommendations for wound patients and their limitations.
  3. Define nutritional considerations for end stage renal disease patient population.
  4. Describe nutritional laboratory findings and patient indications for surveillance.

Outline

Malnutrition/Assessment
  • Malnutrition defined
  • Assessment
  • Food insecurity
Protein calorie malnutrition
  • Definition
  • Treatment
  • Screening
  • Laboratory analysis
Micro nutrient use and supplementation for healing
  • Phosphorus
  • Zinc
  • Ascorbic acid
  • Iron
  • Folate

Wound Care in the Rehab Environment
Role of rehabilitation professionals in wound management, bed and wheelchair positioning, low-light laser therapy, electrical stimulation, diathermy, exercise, and functional mobility.

The path to wound healing is difficult and lengthy, requiring a multidisciplinary approach. Rehabilitation professionals are a vital component of wound care, playing a significant role in implementing modalities, ensuring functional mobility, and assisting with treatments.

Objectives

  1. Discuss the role of rehabilitation professionals in wound management.
  2. Review bed and wheelchair positioning considerations to prevent and treat chronic wounds.
  3. Discuss the effectiveness of modalities in wound management.
  4. Evaluate how exercise and functional mobility impact wound healing.

Outline

Role of rehabilitation professionals in wound management
  • Role — how rehab professionals can assist
  • Types of treatments
  • Positioning — bed and wheelchair
Effectiveness of modalities in wound management
  • Low-light laser therapy
  • Electrical stimulation
  • Diathermy
Impact on Wound Healing
  • Exercise
  • Functional mobility

As a Bonus for Registering For This Course, You'll Also Receive Your Certification as a Wound Care Professional (CWCP) for FREE!
Comprehensive Wound Care Certification Course

$1,539.83 Value
Just For You: Only $149.99 — Unbelievable Savings!
Plus, earn up to 19.75 CE Hours included in the course tuition.
Click here for CE credit details | Click here for course objectives and outline
Evergreen Certifications CBT-C Badge

Are you ready to step into the life awaiting you as a Certified Wound Care Professional (CWCP)?

Certification Made Simple

It's never been easier to become a Certified Wound Care Professional (CWCP):

  • Step 1: Watch this online course.
  • Step 2: Complete the CE test(s) and instantly print your certificate(s) of completion.
  • Step 3: Submit the Certification Questionnaire included in this training, and your application is complete.*

That's it! No hidden fees. No catch. Just certification made EASY.

*Professional standards apply.
Click Here to Learn More About CWCP Certification


Benefits of Certification

  1. Clinical expertise: Show patients, colleagues, and employers your practice is based on leading-edge research in this complex area of wound care.
  2. Patient trust: Certification shows your clients you care about providing the best care possible. It reveals your professional ability to take on challenging clients and succeed!
  3. Documentation of knowledge: Certification is both a professional and personal accomplishment. It's an unbiased barometer of your training and dedication to your practice.
  4. Professional recognition: Set yourself apart from the thousands of clinicians relying on outdated methods to treat their patient. Increase your opportunities for career advancement.

The Next Steps in Advancing Your Practice
Watch your email for your order confirmation, and get instant access to all course materials, including the bonus certification.Click here for course objectives and outline.
Review the course materials at your own pace and at your convenience! You'll have unlimited access to all course videos and materials online forever. Plus, use the PESI Mobile app to access the course content on your phone or tablet. Choose video or audio-only versions of online courses from the world's best instructors, and complete your CE requirements anywhere, anytime, at your own pace.
Instantly collaborate with other professionals on the course materials through interactive message boards. You'll join other dedicated practitioners, focused on their commitment to improving wound care, providing opportunities to exchange insights and experiences, as well as expanding your professional connections
Complete your online CE tests and earn up to 19.75 CE hours! Click here for CE credit details and credit details specific to your profession.
Complete the certification application — at no additional cost — to become a Certified Wound Care Professional (CWCP) through Evergreen Certifications.

100% Satisfaction Guarantee
Register for this intensive training course without risk. If you're not completely satisfied, give us a call at 800-844-8260.

We’re that confident you'll find this learning experience to be all that's promised and more than you expected.
Comprehensive Wound Care Certification Course

$1,539.83 Value
Just For You: Only $149.99 — Unbelievable Savings!
Plus, earn up to 19.75 CE Hours included in the course tuition.
Click here for CE credit details | Click here for course objectives and outline

NOTE: No additional discounts or coupons may be applied to this course.
We partner with Evergreen Certifications to include certification with some of our products. When you purchase such a product, we may disclose your information to Evergreen Certifications for purposes of providing services directly to you or to contact you regarding relevant offers.
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